acosar


acosar
v.
1 to pursue relentlessly.
2 to harass.
3 to besiege, to irritate, to nag, to accost.
El policía persigue a Ricardo The policeman persecutes=harasses Richard.
* * *
acosar
verbo transitivo
1 to pursue, chase
\
FRASEOLOGÍA
acosar a preguntas to bombard with questions
* * *
verb
to harass, hound
* * *
VT
1) (=atosigar) to hound, harass

acosar a algn a preguntas — to pester sb with questions

ser acosado sexualmente — to suffer (from) sexual harassment, be sexually harassed

2) (=perseguir) to pursue relentlessly; [+ animal] to urge on
* * *
verbo transitivo
a) <persona> to hound

acosar sexualmente a alguien — to sexually harass somebody

acosados por el hambre — beset by hunger

me acosaron con preguntas — they plagued o bombarded me with questions

b) <presa> to hound, pursue relentlessly
* * *
= plague, press upon, bait, besiege, harass, bully, dog, persecute, hound, nag (at), pelt, pressurise [pressurize, -USA], importune, pester, nobble, stalk, bedevil, bear down on, harry.
Ex. Title indexes have always been plagued by the absence of terminology control.
Ex. For example, the latter are unlikely to engage themselves in conservation issues as these now press upon the professional consciousness of librarians.
Ex. I guess Ms Lipow should be admired for coming into the lion's den and baiting it, but I find some of her arguments facile and superficial.
Ex. Concurrently, libraries are besieged with greater demands from the academic community for access to and instruction in electronic information resources such as the Internet.
Ex. I have reason to believe that my boss, the head of reference, has been sexually harassing me.
Ex. The director returned to his paperwork, nothing in his heart but hot shame at having permitted himself to be bullied into submission by this disagreeable public official.
Ex. The title of the article is 'Sweeping away the problems that dog the industry?'.
Ex. Why does the ALA ignore, deny or cover up the actions of the only government in the world which persecutes people for the alleged crime of opening uncensored libraries?.
Ex. Jefferson, like Clinton, was hounded by reports of adultery and cowardice in wartime.
Ex. This a book that I had admired but that had nagged at me for years.
Ex. Every day, Internet users are pelted with spam, hoaxes, urban legends, and scams - in other words, untrustworthy data.
Ex. Shearer also made an arse of himself by perpetuating the myth of the noble English sportsman who never dives or pressurises referees.
Ex. He was a shiftless, good-for-nothing man and his shrewish wife was constantly importuning him.
Ex. And there are those whom I have pestered from time to time over the past four years, and who have patiently answered my importunity.
Ex. He was the best striker I ever saw, certainly before the injuries that nobbled him twice.
Ex. So Hutchins arranges her drawings in such a way that as your eye travels leftwards across the page you see the fox who is stalking the hen and trying to catch her.
Ex. The article has the title 'Piracy, crooked printers, inflation bedevil Russian publishing'.
Ex. And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
Ex. They stayed there for the winter, and spent the succeeding three summers harrying the coasts of Ireland and Scotland, after which they returned to Norway.
----
* acosar a Alguien con preguntas = pepper + Nombre + with questions.
* problema + acosar = problem + dog.
* * *
verbo transitivo
a) <persona> to hound

acosar sexualmente a alguien — to sexually harass somebody

acosados por el hambre — beset by hunger

me acosaron con preguntas — they plagued o bombarded me with questions

b) <presa> to hound, pursue relentlessly
* * *
= plague, press upon, bait, besiege, harass, bully, dog, persecute, hound, nag (at), pelt, pressurise [pressurize, -USA], importune, pester, nobble, stalk, bedevil, bear down on, harry.

Ex: Title indexes have always been plagued by the absence of terminology control.

Ex: For example, the latter are unlikely to engage themselves in conservation issues as these now press upon the professional consciousness of librarians.
Ex: I guess Ms Lipow should be admired for coming into the lion's den and baiting it, but I find some of her arguments facile and superficial.
Ex: Concurrently, libraries are besieged with greater demands from the academic community for access to and instruction in electronic information resources such as the Internet.
Ex: I have reason to believe that my boss, the head of reference, has been sexually harassing me.
Ex: The director returned to his paperwork, nothing in his heart but hot shame at having permitted himself to be bullied into submission by this disagreeable public official.
Ex: The title of the article is 'Sweeping away the problems that dog the industry?'.
Ex: Why does the ALA ignore, deny or cover up the actions of the only government in the world which persecutes people for the alleged crime of opening uncensored libraries?.
Ex: Jefferson, like Clinton, was hounded by reports of adultery and cowardice in wartime.
Ex: This a book that I had admired but that had nagged at me for years.
Ex: Every day, Internet users are pelted with spam, hoaxes, urban legends, and scams - in other words, untrustworthy data.
Ex: Shearer also made an arse of himself by perpetuating the myth of the noble English sportsman who never dives or pressurises referees.
Ex: He was a shiftless, good-for-nothing man and his shrewish wife was constantly importuning him.
Ex: And there are those whom I have pestered from time to time over the past four years, and who have patiently answered my importunity.
Ex: He was the best striker I ever saw, certainly before the injuries that nobbled him twice.
Ex: So Hutchins arranges her drawings in such a way that as your eye travels leftwards across the page you see the fox who is stalking the hen and trying to catch her.
Ex: The article has the title 'Piracy, crooked printers, inflation bedevil Russian publishing'.
Ex: And here was the war, implacably bearing down on us.
Ex: They stayed there for the winter, and spent the succeeding three summers harrying the coasts of Ireland and Scotland, after which they returned to Norway.
* acosar a Alguien con preguntas = pepper + Nombre + with questions.
* problema + acosar = problem + dog.

* * *
acosar [A1 ]
vt
1 ‹persona› to hound
lo acosan sus acreedores his creditors are hounding him o are after him
un compañero que la acosaba sexualmente a colleague who was sexually harassing her
se ven acosados por el hambre y las enfermedades they are beset by hunger and disease
me acosaron con preguntas sobre su paradero they plagued o bombarded me with questions regarding his whereabouts
2 ‹presa› to hound, pursue relentlessly
* * *

 

acosar (conjugate acosar) verbo transitivo
a)personato hound;

(sexualmente) to harass;
me acosaron con preguntas they plagued o bombarded me with questions

b)presato hound, pursue relentlessly

acosar verbo transitivo
1 to harass
2 fig (asediar) to pester: la oposición acosó al Presidente del Gobierno con sus preguntas, the opposition pestered the Prime Minister with questions
'acosar' also found in these entries:
Spanish:
arrinconar
- asediar
- hostigar
English:
assault
- beset
- harass
- hound
- mob
- molest
- persecute
- plague
- ply
- stalk
- bait
- goad
- harry
- worry
* * *
acosar, Méx acosijar vt
1. [perseguir] to pursue relentlessly
2. [hostigar] to harass;
lo acosaron a o [m5]con preguntas they fired questions at him;
fue acosada sexualmente en el trabajo she was sexually harassed at work
* * *
acosar
v/t hound, pursue;
me acosaron a preguntas they bombarded me with questions
* * *
acosar vt
perseguir: to pursue, to hound, to harass

Spanish-English dictionary. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • acosar — Se conjuga como: amar Infinitivo: Gerundio: Participio: acosar acosando acosado     Indicativo   presente imperfecto pretérito futuro condicional yo tú él, ella, Ud. nosotros vosotros ellos, ellas, Uds. acoso acosas acosa acosamos acosáis acosan… …   Wordreference Spanish Conjugations Dictionary

  • acosar — verbo transitivo 1. Perseguir (una persona o un animal) [a una persona o un animal] sin descanso: Los defensas acosan continuamente a nuestra estrella, que no está haciendo un buen partido. Los lobos acosan a su presa hasta que la rodean y la… …   Diccionario Salamanca de la Lengua Española

  • acosar — (Del ant. cosso, carrera). 1. tr. Perseguir, sin darle tregua ni reposo, a un animal o a una persona. 2. Hacer correr al caballo. 3. Perseguir, apremiar, importunar a alguien con molestias o requerimientos …   Diccionario de la lengua española

  • acosar — (Del lat. cosso, carrera, curso < cursus, us, derivado de currere, correr.) ► verbo transitivo 1 Perseguir a una persona o un animal sin tregua: ■ la policía acosó al fugitivo hasta dar con él. 2 Hacer peticiones o preguntas molestas a una… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • acosar — {{#}}{{LM A00566}}{{〓}} {{ConjA00566}}{{\}}CONJUGACIÓN{{/}}{{SynA00578}} {{[}}acosar{{]}} ‹a·co·sar› {{《}}▍ v.{{》}} {{<}}1{{>}} Perseguir sin dar tregua o descanso: • El león acosó a su presa hasta derribarla.{{○}} {{<}}2{{>}} Importunar o… …   Diccionario de uso del español actual con sinónimos y antónimos

  • acosar — (v) (Intermedio) seguir a una persona o animal con objetivo de detenerlo o hacerle daño Ejemplos: Los policías acosaban al sospechoso durante tres días y al final lo capturaron. Cazadores acosan a un león que ha escapado del zoo. Colocaciones:… …   Español Extremo Basic and Intermediate

  • acosar — v tr (Se conjuga como amar) 1 Perseguir a un animal o a una persona sin darle descanso o tregua con el fin de atraparlo o cazarlo: Acosó a su presa hasta acorralarla 2 Persistir alguna cosa o insistir en algo que molesta, duele o daña a alguna… …   Español en México

  • acosar — transitivo 1) perseguir, estrechar, acosijar (México), atosigar, agobiar. 2) importunar, molestar, asediar, hostigar, no dejar ni a sol ni a sombra, hostilizar. * * * …   Diccionario de sinónimos y antónimos

  • acosar — tr. Perseguir sin descanso …   Diccionario Castellano

  • acular —   acosar …   Diccionario de Guanacastequismos

  • echar los perros a alguien — Acosar, reñir o enfrentarse a una persona. . Procede la locución de la antigua costumbre de echar perros a los toros bravos, para cansarlos y poder sujetarlos, para conducirlos a algún lugar o simplemente como uno de los apartados que… …   Diccionario de dichos y refranes


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